The Royal Commission to Inquire into Confiscation of Native Lands (Sim Commission) reported to the New Zealand government 1928: 1945: Maori Social and Economic Advancement Act: Paikea`s plan was to extend the structure of the War Effort organization to New Zealand in peacetime. But Paikea died in 1943 and the Department of Native Affairs (marginalized by tribal committees) restored control. 1852: The Constitution Act gave the right to vote to men who held individual property rights – most Maori owned land under communal title, they were disqualified from voting. 1922: The Te Arawa Trust Board was established after the Crown accepted the Fishing Rights of the Freemasons and rights to the Rotorua Lakes. In 1926, Tuwharetoa obtained a similar grant from the Crown. Quoted in Scott, D. Ask That Mountain, Heinemann/Southern Cross, 1975 Te Whānau-a-Apanui hopes to reach an agreement on its historic claims by mid-year. Although the Waitangi Tribunal has documented treaty violations that challenge the notion of British justice (see, for example. B Orakei report), little has been done to appease the Iwi and restore their economic base. ”As is often the case, the great argument that justified British imperialism – that it introduced the rule of law – was discerned by the prostitution of this law in the interest of the colonizing race” [11] 1985: Treaty of Waitangi Amendment Act: amended the 1975 Act, which allowed Maori to claim the Waitangi Tribunal of 1840. This was the first time that the Iwi had a platform within the Pakeha system where they could assert their historical dysfunctions. The reaction of many Pakéha New Zealanders has been fear and perplexity – for the first time in the twentieth century, the scale of injustice against Maori has reached Pakeha consciousness.

. . .